THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE 狮子·女巫·魔衣橱

2019-11-07 02:23:12 时代英语·高一 2019年6期

CHAPTER TWO WHAT LUCY FOUND THERE

第二章 露茜的孤身奇遇

“GOOD EVENING,” said Lucy. But the Faun was so busy picking up its parcels that at first it did not reply. When it had finished it made her a little bow.

“Good evening, good evening,” said the Faun. “Excuse me—I dont want to be inquisitive—but should I be right in thinking that you are a Daughter of Eve?”

“My names Lucy,” said she, not quite understanding him.

“But you are—forgive me—you are what they call a girl?” said the Faun.

“Of course Im a girl,” said Lucy.

“You are in fact Human?”

“Of course Im human,” said Lucy, still a little puzzled.

“To be sure, to be sure,” said the Faun. “How stupid of me! But Ive never seen a Son of Adam or a Daughter of Eve before. I am delighted. That is to say—” and then it stopped as if it had been going to say something it had not intended but had remembered in time. “Delighted, delighted,” it went on. “Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Tumnus.”

“I am very pleased to meet you, Mr Tumnus,” said Lucy.

“And may I ask, O Lucy Daughter of Eve,” said Mr Tumnus, “how you have come into Narnia?”

“Narnia? Whats that?” said Lucy.

“This is the land of Narnia,” said the Faun, “where we are now; all that lies between the lamp-post and the great castle of Cair Paravel on the eastern sea. And you—you have come from the wild woods of the west?”

“I—I got in through the wardrobe in the spare room,” said Lucy

“Ah!” said Mr Tumnus in a rather melancholy voice, “If only I had worked harder at geography when I was a little Faun, I should no doubt know all about those strange countries. It is too late now.”

“But they arent countries at all,” said Lucy, almost laughing. “Its only just back there—at least—Im not sure. It is summer there.”

“Meanwhile,” said Mr Tumnus, “it is winter in Narnia, and has been for ever so long, and we shall both catch cold if we stand here talking in the snow. Daughter of Eve from the far land of Spare Room where eternal summer reigns around the bright city of War Drobe, how would it be if you came and had tea with me?”

“Thank you very much, Mr Tumnus,” said Lucy. “But I was wondering whether I ought to be getting back.”

“Its only just round the corner,” said the Faun, “and therell be a roaring fire—and toast—and sardines—and cake.”

“Well, its very kind of you,” said Lucy. “But I shant be able to stay long.”

“If you will take my arm, Daughter of Eve,” said Mr Tumnus, “I shall be able to hold the umbrella over both of us. Thats the way. Now—off we go.”

By C. S. Lewis

——C. S.刘易斯(万洁 译)

C. S. 刘易斯(1898—1963),英国著名作家,所著儿童故事集《纳尼亚传奇》七部曲,情节动人,妙趣横生。本文选自《纳尼亚传奇》第一部《狮子·女巫·魔衣橱》。

“晚上好。”露茜说。可半人羊正忙着捡它掉在地上的纸包,所以一开始并没有作答。收拾完之后,它便向露茜微微鞠了一躬。

“晚上好啊,晚上好啊。”半人羊说,“不好意思,我本不是个爱问东问西的人,但是假若我没猜错的话,你一定是夏娃之女吧?”

“我叫露茜。”她说,带着一副不解的样子。

“但是你是……恕我冒昧……你是所谓的‘女孩吗?”半人羊问。

“我当然是女孩啦!”露茜说。

“这么说你实际上是人类喽?”

“我当然是人类啦!”露茜说,她更困惑了。

“那当然,那当然,”半人羊忙不迭地说,“我可真是蠢到家了!可我以前从没见过亚当之子或夏娃之女啊。我很高兴能见到你。我的意思是说……”它突然停顿了一下,就好像它正要说的不是自己愿意说的话,终于及时记起来应该说什么一样,“我很高兴,很高兴。”它继续絮叨着,“请容我介绍一下自己,我叫图姆纳斯。”

“我很高兴见到你,图姆纳斯先生。”露茜说。

“那么请问,夏娃之女露茜,”图姆纳斯先生说,“你是怎么来到纳尼亚的呢?”

“纳尼亚?那是什么?”露茜问道。

“纳尼亚就是这里,”图姆纳斯说,“就是我们现在所在的这片大地——从这个灯柱到东海岸上伟大的凯尔帕拉维尔城堡之间的大地。你呢?你是从西面的野林中来的吗?”

“我……我是通过房间的衣橱来的。”露茜说。

“啊!”图姆纳斯先生发出一声叹息,“我小的时候要是在地理上多下点功夫就好了,那样我肯定就能知道所有奇奇怪怪的国家了。可惜现在太晚了。”

“可我说的根本就不是国家啊。”露茜差点笑出声来,“不过就是那边罢了……至少……我不确定。那边还是夏天呢。”

“而这边,”图姆纳斯先生说,“我们的纳尼亚还是冬天,而且已经过了相当长一段时间的冬天。要是继续站在雪地里聊天,咱俩肯定都得感冒。夏娃之女,你来自遥远的空屋之国,那里永恒的夏天统治着光明的衣橱之城。你跟我一起去喝杯热茶怎么样?”

“非常感谢,图姆纳斯先生。”露茜说,“可我怕到时找不到回家的路。”

“我家就在那个角落附近,”半人羊說,“那儿有烧得正旺的炉火,有烤面包、沙丁鱼和蛋糕。”

“嗯,太谢谢你了。”露茜说,“可我不能久坐。”

“夏娃之女,请挽着我的手臂。”图姆纳斯先生说,“这样我就能为咱们俩撑伞了。就走这条路,咱们现在就出发吧。”

And so Lucy found herself walking through the wood arm in arm with this strange creature as if they had known one another all their lives.

They had not gone far before they came to a place where the ground became rough and there were rocks all about and little hills up and little hills down. At the bottom of one small valley Mr Tumnus turned suddenly aside as if he were going to walk straight into an unusually large rock, but at the last moment Lucy found he was leading her into the entrance of a cave. As soon as they were inside she found herself blinking in the light of a wood fire. Then Mr Tumnus stooped and took a flaming piece of wood out of the fire with a neat little pair of tongs, and lit a lamp. “Now we shant be long,” he said, and immediately put a kettle on.

Lucy thought she had never been in a nicer place. It was a little, dry, clean cave of reddish stone with a carpet on the floor and two little chairs (“one for me and one for a friend,” said Mr Tumnus) and a table and a dresser and a mantelpiece over the fire and above that a picture of an old Faun with a grey beard. In one corner there was a door which Lucy thought must lead to Mr Tumnuss bedroom, and on one wall was a shelf full of books. Lucy looked at these while he was setting out the tea things. They had titles like The Life and Letters of Silenus or Nymphs and Their Ways or Men, Monks and Gamekeepers; A Study in Popular Legend or Is Man a Myth?

“Now, Daughter of Eve!” said the Faun.

And really it was a wonderful tea. There was a nice brown egg, lightly boiled, for each of them, and then sardines on toast, and then buttered toast, and then toast with honey, and then a sugar-topped cake. And when Lucy was tired of eating the Faun began to talk. He had wonderful tales to tell of life in the forest. He told about the midnight dances and how the Nymphs who lived in the wells and the Dryads who lived in the trees came out to dance with the Fauns; about long hunting parties after the milk-white stag who could give you wishes if you caught him; about feasting and treasure-seeking with the wild Red Dwarfs in deep mines and caverns far beneath the forest floor; and then about summer when the woods were green and old Silenus on his fat donkey would come to visit them, and sometimes Bacchus himself, and then the streams would run with wine instead of water and the whole forest would give itself up to jollification for weeks on end. “Not that it isnt always winter now,” he added gloomily. Then to cheer himself up he took out from its case on the dresser a strange little flute that looked as if it were made of straw and began to play. And the tune he played made Lucy want to cry and laugh and dance and go to sleep all at the same time. It must have been hours later when she shook herself and said:

于是,露茜就這样挽着这个奇怪的陌生“人”的胳膊一起穿过树林,就好像他们有一辈子那么长的深厚交情一样。

没走多远,他们脚下的路就变得崎岖起来,到处都是石头,还有起伏不大的上下坡。到了一个小山谷的谷底,图姆纳斯先生突然急转向一边,仿佛要直直地撞向一块硕大的岩石,不过,露茜马上发现它是在带着她向一个洞穴的入口走去。进洞之后露茜立刻被柴火耀眼的光芒闪得直眨眼睛。图姆纳斯先生俯身用一把小巧的火钳从火堆中拣出一根烧着的木柴,点上一盏灯。“马上就好。”它说,随即在火上架起一把壶。

露茜觉得这是她到过的最舒服的地方了。这是一个干燥而整洁的小洞穴,四周环绕着红色的石头,脚下铺着一块地毯,地上摆着两把小椅子(“一张我坐,一张给朋友坐。”图姆纳斯先生说)、一张桌子和一个梳妆台,柴火上方还装着一个壁炉架,而顺着壁炉架往上看是一幅肖像画,画中是一位蓄着灰络腮胡的老半人羊。角落里有一扇门,露茜想门那边一定是图姆纳斯先生的卧室。一面墙上安着架子,架子上放满了书。露茜趁着它沏茶倒水的空当打量着这些藏书,其中有《森林之神的生活与文学》《山林水泽仙女芳踪》《人类、僧侣和猎场看守人》《民间传说研究》和《人类是否只是一个传说?》等。

“夏娃之女,我们现在可以开始用餐啦!”半人羊说。

这绝对算得上是一顿丰盛的茶点。每人面前一枚煮得很嫩的棕褐色鸡蛋,还有铺着沙丁鱼的烤面包、涂着黄油的烤面包、抹着蜂蜜的烤面包,最后是上面撒有白糖的蛋糕。等露茜有点吃不下的时候,半人羊才开口说话。关于森林中的生活,它有不少美妙的故事可讲。它讲了住在水井中的山林水泽仙女和住在森林里的护树女神,描述了她们是如何在午夜时分外出和半人羊翩翩起舞的;讲了为了捕捉乳白色的牡鹿而组织起来的长长的狩猎队伍——传说抓住那头鹿便可以梦想成真;讲了和荒野红衣小矮人在深林地下极深的矿井和洞窟中共赴盛宴以及一起寻宝的事情;还讲了夏日里绿意盎然之时,年迈的森林之神就会骑着那头肥壮的驴子拜访林中神灵,有时候酒神巴克斯也会来做客,届时林间溪流中流淌的便不再是水,而是美酒佳酿,然后整座森林就会持续数周沉浸在热闹欢腾的氛围里。“可惜现在冬天总是没完没了。”它沮丧地加了一句。然后,为了让自己振作起来,它从梳妆台的抽屉里取出一把古怪的小笛子吹奏起来,笛子看上去好像是用稻草做的。它的笛声让露茜又想哭又想笑,同时也想跳舞,甚至还想睡觉。

等到露茜从这些情绪中摆脱出来时,它已经吹了几个钟头了。露茜说:

Word Study

inquisitive /?n'kw?z?t?v/ adj. 好奇的,爱打听的

He was very chatty and inquisitive about everything.

dresser /'dres?(r)/ n. 梳妝台

In the top picture, there is a dresser on one side of the room.

“Oh, Mr Tumnus—Im so sorry to stop you, and I do love that tune—but really, I must go home. I only meant to stay for a few minutes.”

“Its no good now, you know,” said the Faun, laying down its flute and shaking its head at her very sorrowfully.

“No good?” said Lucy, jumping up and feeling rather frightened. “What do you mean? Ive got to go home at once. The others will be wondering what has happened to me.” But a moment later she asked, “Mr Tumnus! Whatever is the matter?” for the Fauns brown eyes had filled with tears and then the tears began trickling down its cheeks, and soon they were running off the end of its nose; and at last it covered its face with its hands and began to howl.

“Mr Tumnus! Mr Tumnus!” said Lucy in great distress. “Dont! Dont! What is the matter? Aren you well? Dear Mr Tumnus, do tell me what is wrong.” But the Faun continued sobbing as if its heart would break. And even when Lucy went over and put her arms round him and lent him her handkerchief, he did not stop. He merely took the handkerchief and kept on using it, wringing it out with both hands whenever it got too wet to be any more use, so that presently Lucy was standing in a damp patch.

“Mr Tumnus!” bawled Lucy in his ear, shaking him. “Do stop. Stop it at once! You ought to be ashamed of yourself, a great big Faun like you. What on earth are you crying about?”

“Oh—oh—oh!” sobbed Mr Tumnus, “Im crying because Im such a bad Faun.”

“I dont think youre a bad Faun at all,” said Lucy. “I think you are a very good Faun. You are the nicest Faun Ive ever met.”

“Oh—oh—you wouldnt say that if you knew,” replied Mr Tumnus between his sobs. “No, Im a bad Faun. I dont suppose there ever was a worse Faun since the beginning of the world.”

“But what have you done?” asked Lucy.

“My old father, now,” said Mr Tumnus; “thats his picture over the mantelpiece. He would never have done a thing like this.”

“A thing like what?” said Lucy.

“Like what Ive done,” said the Faun. “Taken service under the White Witch. Thats what I am. Im in the pay of the White Witch.”

“The White Witch? Who is she?”

“Why, it is she that has got all Narnia under her thumb. Its she that makes it always winter. Always winter and never Christmas; think of that!”

“How awful!” said Lucy. “But what does she pay you for?”

“Thats the worst of it,” said Mr Tumnus with a deep groan. “Im a kidnapper for her, thats what I am. Look at me, Daughter of Eve. Would you believe that Im the sort of Faun to meet a poor innocent child in the wood, one that had never done me any harm, and pretend to be friendly with it, and invite it home to my cave, all for the sake of lulling it asleep and then handing it over to the White Witch?”

“No,” said Lucy. “Im sure you wouldnt do anything of the sort.”

“But I have,” said the Faun.

“Well,” said Lucy rather slowly (for she wanted to be truthful and yet not be too hard on him), “well, that was pretty bad. But youre so sorry for it that Im sure you will never do it again.”

“哦,圖姆纳斯先生,我很抱歉要打断你,虽然我很喜欢你的笛声,但是我真的必须回家了。我本来只打算在这儿待几分钟的。”

“现在情况很糟,你知道吗?”半人羊说,它放下它的小笛子,对她摇摇头,一副忧心忡忡的样子。

“很糟?”露茜说,她被这句话吓得跳了起来,“什么意思?我得马上回家。其他人会担心我的。”紧接着,她又问道,“图姆纳斯先生!到底出了什么事?”因为她看到半人羊棕色的双眼里泪光闪闪的,紧接着泪珠就开始顺着脸颊流淌,片刻的工夫,泪珠就从它的鼻尖滴了下来,最后,它双手捂住脸,竟然失声痛哭起来。

“图姆纳斯先生!图姆纳斯先生!”露茜很是焦急,“别哭了!别哭了!到底怎么了?你不舒服吗?亲爱的图姆纳斯先生,快告诉我到底出了什么事吧。”可半人羊却继续自顾自地呜咽,就好像它的心都碎了一样。即便是露茜走上前去,用双臂拥抱它,又掏出手帕递给它,它都没停止哭泣。它只是接过手帕不停地抹泪,湿透了再用双手拧干,然后继续用它抹泪。因此,露茜现在站的这块地都变得有些潮湿了。

“图姆纳斯先生!”露茜冲着它的耳朵大叫,摇晃着它的身子,“快别哭了,现在就停下!作为一个顶天立地的成年半人羊,你应该为自己这副样子感到羞愧。你到底是为什么哭呀?”

“哦——哦——哦——”图姆纳斯先生抽泣着说,“我哭是因为我自己是个坏透了的半人羊。”

“可我一点也不认为你坏啊。”露茜说,“我觉得你是个非常好的半人羊。你是我见过的最善良可亲的半人羊。”

“如果你知道我干了什么你就不会这么说了。”图姆纳斯先生抽抽搭搭地回答说,“我就是个坏半人羊,我想我是这世界上有史以来最坏的半人羊了。”

“你到底做了什么坏事啊?”露茜问。

“我的老父亲,”图姆纳斯先生说,“壁炉架上挂的就是它的肖像,它就永远也不会做出这种事儿来。”

“哪种事儿?”露茜说。

“我做的这种事儿,”半人羊说,“听命于白女巫。我就是这样的坏人,是白女巫的狗奴才。”

“白女巫?她是谁?”

“啊!她就是将整个纳尼亚玩弄于股掌之中的人啊,她就是让这里的每一天都是冬天的人啊。一直是冬天,却总也等不来圣诞节,你能想象有多惨吗!”

“好可恶啊!”露茜说,“那她都指使你干些什么呢?”

“这是我最难启齿的。”图姆纳斯长叹一声,“她让我替她诱拐小孩,我就是个人贩子。看看我,夏娃之女。作为半人羊的我若是在树林里碰见可怜无辜的小孩儿——一个从未伤害过我的小孩儿,我会装作很友好的样子将他邀请到我家——这个洞穴中来,只为了哄他睡着再将他交给白女巫。你能想象这样的我吗?”

“不会的。”露茜说,“我确信你不会做出那样的事来。”

“可我确实做了。”半人羊说。

“嗯,”露茜说得很慢(因为她既想诚实地回答,又不愿伤害它),“嗯,这确实是很坏的事。不过既然你已经感到很愧疚了,我相信你以后再也不会做这样的事了。”

“Daughter of Eve, dont you understand?” said the Faun. “It isnt something I have done. Im doing it now, this very moment.”

“What do you mean?” cried Lucy, turning very white.

“You are the child,” said Tumnus. “I had orders from the White Witch that if ever I saw a Son of Adam or a Daughter of Eve in the wood, I was to catch them and hand them over to her. And you are the first Ive ever met. And Ive pretended to be your friend and asked you to tea, and all the time Ive been meaning to wait till you were asleep and then go and tell her.”

“Oh, but you wont, Mr Tumnus,” said Lucy. “You wont, will you? Indeed, indeed you really mustnt.”

“And if I dont,” said he, beginning to cry again, “shes sure to find out. And shell have my tail cut off and my horns sawn off, and my beard plucked out, and shell wave her wand over my beautiful clove hoofs and turn them into horrid solid hoofs like wretched horses. And if she is extra and specially angry shell turn me into stone and I shall be only statue of a Faun in her horrible house until the four thrones at Cair Paravel are filled and goodness knows when that will happen, or whether it will ever happen at all.”

“Im very sorry, Mr Tumnus,” said Lucy. “But please let me go home.”

“Of course I will,” said the Faun. “Of course Ive got to. I see that now. I hadnt known what Humans were like before I met you. Of course I cant give you up to the Witch; not now that I know you. But we must be off at once. Ill see you back to the lamp-post. I suppose you can find your own way from there back to Spare Room and War Drobe?”

“Im sure I can,” said Lucy.

“We must go as quietly as we can,” said Mr Tumnus. “The whole wood is full of her spies. Even some of the trees are on her side.”

They both got up and left the tea things on the table, and Mr Tumnus once more put up his umbrella and gave Lucy his arm, and they went out into the snow. The journey back was not at all like the journey to the Fauns cave; they stole along as quickly as they could, without speaking a word, and Mr Tumnus kept to the darkest places. Lucy was relieved when they reached the lamp-post again.

“Do you know your way from here, Daughter of Eve?” said Tumnus.

Lucy looked very hard between the trees and could just see in the distance a patch of light that looked like daylight. “Yes,” she said, “I can see the wardrobe door.”

“Then be off home as quick as you can,” said the Faun, “and—c—can you ever forgive me for what meant to do?”

“Why, of course I can,” said Lucy, shaking him heartily by the hand. “And I do hope you wont get into dreadful trouble on my account.”

“Farewell, Daughter of Eve,” said he. “Perhaps I may keep the handkerchief?”

“Rather!” said Lucy, and then ran towards the far off patch of daylight as quickly as her legs would carry her. And presently instead of rough branch brushing past her she felt coats, and instead of crunching snow under her feet she felt wooden board and all at once she found herself jumping out of the wardrobe into the same empty room from which the whole adventure had started. She shut the wardrobe door tightly behind her and looked around, panting for breath. It was still raining and she could hear the voices of the others in the passage.

“Im here,” she shouted. “Im here. Ive come back. Im all right.”

“夏娃之女,你難道不明白吗?”半人羊说,“我说的并不是过去做的事儿,而是我现在就在做的事儿啊。”

“你的意思是?”露茜叫出声来,脸色变得煞白。

“你就是我说的那个小孩儿啊!”图姆纳斯说,“白女巫命令我,如果我在林子里看到亚当之子或夏娃之女,我就得抓住他,然后把他交给她。你是我遇上的第一个人。我刚刚就是假装和你交朋友并且邀请你来喝茶,等你睡着了好跑去给她通风报信。”

“噢,但是你不会的,图姆纳斯先生。”露茜说,“你不会这么干的,对吗?你可千万别这么做。”

“如果我不这么做,”它说着又开始哭泣了,“她一定会发现的。到时候她就会把我的尾巴切掉,把我的犄角锯掉,再把我的络腮胡拔掉,并挥舞着魔杖把我美丽的羊蹄变成丑陋的马蹄。而且要是她大发雷霆,我就会被她变成石头,然后我就只能在她那座可怕的宫殿里当一座雕塑,直到有人坐上凯尔帕拉维尔的四个王位时魔咒才能解除。而那一刻天知道要等到什么时候,或许永远都不会到来。”

“我为你感到非常难过,图姆纳斯先生。”露茜说,“但请让我回家吧。”

“我当然会让你回家的。”半人羊说,“当然让你回家。我现在明白了。我见到你之前不知道人类是什么样的。我现在认识你了,当然不能把你交到女巫手里。但是我们必须现在就离开。我现在把你送回到灯柱那里吧。我想你应该能找到回去的路的,从那儿回到空屋和衣橱对吧?”

“我确信我能。”露茜说。

“我们必须悄悄地走,动静越小越好。”图姆纳斯先生说,“整个森林都有她的眼线。甚至有些树木都投靠了她。”

他们一起站起身,将茶杯等放回桌子上,图姆纳斯先生再次撑起伞,挽起露茜的胳膊,走入雪中。和刚才去半人羊的住处那一路上相比,返程的情形可大不一样:他们尽可能走得飞快,两人都一言不发,图姆纳斯先生尽挑黑暗的地方走。最后他们终于再次来到了灯柱下,露茜这才松了一口气。

“你知道从这儿怎么回去吗,夏娃之女?”图姆纳斯说。

露茜隐隐约约看到远处树林间有一小片光,好像是日光,于是她说:“知道,我能看见衣橱的门。”

“那就赶快回家吧,”半人羊说,“还请你原谅我之前的不良企图,好吗?”

“当然可以原谅你啦!”露茜一边说一边爽快地握了握它的手,“我衷心希望你可千万别因为我的事给自己带来什么麻烦。”

“别了,夏娃之女!”它说,“我能留下这块手帕吗?”

“留着吧!”露茜说,然后尽全力向远处那一小块亮光跑去。她要多快有多快地跑着。不一会儿,她两边掠过的就不再是粗糙的树枝了,而是一件件大衣;脚下踩的也不再是雪,而是木板。随即她便跳出了衣橱,回到了这次历险的起点——那个空荡荡的房间。她将衣橱门紧紧地在背后关上,气喘吁吁地向四下张望。外面还在下雨,她听到走廊上有其他人的说话声。

“我在这儿!”她大喊,“我在这儿!我回来了,我没事儿!”

Word Study

ashamed /?'?e?md/ adj. 感到羞耻的;惭愧的

You should be ashamed of yourself for telling such lies.

relieved /r?'li?vd/ adj. 感到宽慰的;放心的

Youll be relieved to know your jobs are safe.